Bar Flunkers, Kavanaugh and Schools in Bankruptcy: The Best Legal Stories of 2018

0
19
<p class = "canvas-atom canvas-text Mb (1.0em) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8em) – sm" type = "text" content = "Students at Yale Law School on September 24, 2018, to protest the confirmation of Judge Brett Kavanaugh. Photo: Diego Radzinschi.

Registration bounces (a little) Law schools still have a long way to go before returning to the bright days of 2010, as more than 52,000 new students come to campuses across the country. In fact, many experts believe that it is unlikely that registrations will return to these levels. Still, 2018 left a glimmer of hope that the popularity of legal education was on the rise. The number of candidates for class 1L this fall enriched by 8%, with the schools finally enroll 3% more students. This may not seem like much, but enrollments were down or stagnant the previous seven years. Experts believe that employment rates have risen – mainly because of the reduced number of graduates – and that the tumult of Washington, DC, provoked by the Trump administration is prompting more people to pursue a legal career.

Ian Samuel.

#MeToo arrives at the Faculty of Law Superstar professor Yale Law, Jed Rubenfeld, was closely examined for his conduct with students whom he taught and mentees, alleging that he was a victim of sexual harassment. Jay Kesan, Professor of Law at the University of Illinois takes a year off unpaid after the announcement, according to which it was the subject of a survey last year after students and professors complained about sexual harassment. (The university's investigation found that Kesan's behavior contravened the campus code of conduct but did not reach the level of unconditional sexual behavior.) Mandatory Arbitration in Law Firms – is here subject to investigation of misconduct under Title IX of the University. These developments stem from not one but two deans of laws who resigned in 2017 amid allegations of sexual harassment. It appears that the judgment on sexual misconduct at the workplace is gain ground within the legal academy.

Recruitment on campus gets a new look What will the very important summer associate recruitment process look like in August? We are not really sure. The National Association for the Placement of the Law (NALP) in December revised its recruitment guidelines on campus and eliminated all the specific synchronization rules. For example, companies no longer need to wait until December of their 1st year to start recruiting and do not need to give 28 days to law students to decide whether or not to accept an offer. The new guidelines are aimed at giving companies more flexibility in their recruitment methods. It is therefore up to the various law schools to decide on the requirements to be imposed on companies that come to hire. In short, things could look a lot like those of past years. Or it could be Wild West there. We will wait and see.

US Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh.

Brett Kavanaugh makes things happen It seems that virtually everyone connected to the legal academy has reflected on Brett Kavanaugh's controversial appointment to the United States Supreme Court. do not be afraid to share them. But nowhere has the debate about Kavanaugh been as visibly visible as at Yale Law School and Harvard Law School – the two elite institutions with which the present justice is most closely linked. Christine Blasey Ford's claim that Kavanaugh and a friend allegedly attempted to rape her at a high school party in the 1980s prompted many the search for the soul of students and professors Yale Law School on the role of the institution in its professional progression virtually smoothly. And at Harvard, where Kavanaugh taught as a visiting professor starting in 2009, students called on the school to cut ties. (Kavanaugh got out of his two-week January course on the modern Supreme Court, which had already been scheduled, apparently of his own free will.)

Continuing legal proceedings against the ABA The American Bar Association's outside lawyers at Sidley Austin have been busy in 2018. Applying to the ABA's legal training section and being admitted to the bar for allegedly illegal accreditation practices was all the rage. The Cooley Law School at Western Michigan University launched the trend in November 2017, but by May Florida's Florida School of Law, the Charlotte School of Law and Arizona Summit Law School, now closed, joined the pursuit party. The four schools were found to be non-compliant with the standards of the ABA Faculty of Law. However, since then, Cooley has once again become one of the good manners of ABA. dropped his suit. The pursuit, however, could not save the besieged summit of Arizona. he stopped holding the class this fall and is scheduled to officially close once current students complete their degrees on other campuses.

Closed for business The closing of the law schools continued in 2018. The Arizona summit was closed and The University of Valparaiso announced in October that it would withdraw his law school amidst the shortages of enrollments. He did not bring a new class of students this fall when he was aiming to transfer the school to another university. But her efforts to give law school to Middle Tennessee State University have been halted by the tutelary authorities, and she will be stopped by 2020. Meanwhile, the John Marshall Law School in Atlanta pulled the sheet on the Savannah Law School, its satellite campus that has existed for only six years. Will the closures continue in 2019? Thomas Jefferson Law School is fighting for his lifeand many other schools are in trouble.

Law students vs. Big Law This is a story of David and Goliath, in which brave law students play the role of David in the role of Goliath in Big Law. The groups opposed the mandatory arbitration policies for lawyers and non-lawyers in law firms and legal organizations. In the spring, law students from elite schools pushed legal employers to disclose whether or not they require employees to sign such agreements. In the fall, students at Harvard Law School's Pipeline Parity project urged their classmates to boycott companies they knew were using compulsory arbitration, and they achieved fast results. Kirkland & Ellis retreated on compulsory arbitration within two weeks, while Sidley Austin did it without being the subject of a specific boycott. The group is now turning to DLA Piper.

LSAT goes digital The LSAT has existed for 70 years in the form of a paper-and-pencil test. In 2018, the announcement of the update of the examination is now indispensable. From July, the test will be offered digitally on Microsoft Surface Go tablets, with half of the LSAT takers using the tablets. It will be fully digital by September, which will bring it in line with all other standardized graduate admission tests. The admission board of the law school plans to buy about 30,000 tablets to make the transition. Not only that, but the written part of the exam will be separated from the main multi-choice part with the takers completing it at their convenience on their own computer. See you soon, pencils # 2!

The GRE arrives strong L & # 39; ABA flattened in August when the time comes to decide whether it abandons the longstanding requirement that law schools use the LSAT in their admissions. But that did not dampen the tendency of law schools to accept GRE scores alongside LSAT scores. Fewer than 10 law schools accepted GRE in early 2018. Today, 34 schools allow applicants to submit their results for one or the other test. This means that more than one-sixth of the schools participate in the alternative exam. Among the remarkable GRE embracers this year: University of New York Law School; Cornell Law School; and the Faculty of Law, University of Pennsylvania.

Bar Blues All who hoped that 2018 would be the year of passing the exam passed successfully to recover success rates were deeply disappointed, much like the 59% from those who sat on the California bar in July and failed. Ouch. Success rates have also decreased in other major jurisdictions. New York success rate fell five percentage points at 63 percent; Florida rate dropped to 67 percent 71 percent; and the success rate of the first Texas taker fell three points at 78 percent. The national average score in the multi-bar portion of the test has reached a 34 years old"data-reactid =" 27 ">Students at Yale Law School on September 24, 2018, to protest the confirmation of Judge Brett Kavanaugh. Photo: Diego Radzinschi.

Registration bounces (a little) Law schools still have a long way to go before returning to the bright days of 2010, as more than 52,000 new students come to campuses across the country. In fact, many experts believe that it is unlikely that registrations will return to these levels. Still, 2018 left a glimmer of hope that the popularity of legal education was on the rise. The number of candidates for class 1L this fall enriched by 8%, with the schools finally enroll 3% more students. This may not seem like much, but enrollments were down or stagnant the previous seven years. Experts believe that employment rates have risen – mainly because of the reduced number of graduates – and that the tumult of Washington, DC, provoked by the Trump administration is prompting more people to pursue a legal career.

Ian Samuel.

#MeToo arrives at the Faculty of Law Superstar professor Yale Law, Jed Rubenfeld, was closely examined for his conduct with students whom he taught and mentees, alleging that he was a victim of sexual harassment. Jay Kesan, Professor of Law at the University of Illinois takes a year off unpaid after the announcement, according to which it was the subject of a survey last year after students and professors complained about sexual harassment. (The university's investigation found that Kesan's behavior contravened the campus code of conduct but did not reach the level of unconditional sexual behavior.) Mandatory Arbitration in Law Firms – is here subject to investigation of misconduct under Title IX of the University. These developments stem from not one but two deans of laws who resigned in 2017 amid allegations of sexual harassment. It appears that the judgment on sexual misconduct at the workplace is gain ground within the legal academy.

Recruitment on campus gets a new look What will the very important summer associate recruitment process look like in August? We are not really sure. The National Association for the Placement of the Law (NALP) in December revised its recruitment guidelines on campus and eliminated all the specific synchronization rules. For example, companies no longer need to wait until December of their 1st year to start recruiting and do not need to give 28 days to law students to decide whether or not to accept an offer. The new guidelines are aimed at giving companies more flexibility in their recruitment methods. It is therefore up to the various law schools to decide on the requirements to be imposed on companies that come to hire. In short, things could look a lot like those of past years. Or it could be Wild West there. We will wait and see.

US Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh.

Brett Kavanaugh makes things happen It seems that virtually everyone connected to the legal academy has reflected on Brett Kavanaugh's controversial appointment to the United States Supreme Court. do not be afraid to share them. But nowhere has the debate about Kavanaugh been as visibly visible as at Yale Law School and Harvard Law School – the two elite institutions with which the present justice is most closely linked. Christine Blasey Ford's claim that Kavanaugh and a friend allegedly attempted to rape her at a high school party in the 1980s prompted many the search for the soul of students and professors Yale Law School on the role of the institution in its professional progression virtually smoothly. And at Harvard, where Kavanaugh taught as a visiting professor starting in 2009, students called on the school to cut ties. (Kavanaugh got out of his two-week January course on the modern Supreme Court, which had already been scheduled, apparently of his own free will.)

Continuing legal proceedings against the ABA The American Bar Association's outside lawyers at Sidley Austin have been busy in 2018. Applying to the ABA's legal training section and being admitted to the bar for allegedly illegal accreditation practices was all the rage. The Cooley Law School at Western Michigan University launched the trend in November 2017, but by May Florida's Florida School of Law, the Charlotte School of Law and Arizona Summit Law School, now closed, joined the pursuit party. The four schools were found to be non-compliant with the standards of the ABA Faculty of Law. However, since then, Cooley has once again become one of the good manners of ABA. dropped his suit. The pursuit, however, could not save the besieged summit of Arizona. he stopped holding the class this fall and is scheduled to officially close once current students complete their degrees on other campuses.

Closed for business The closing of the law schools continued in 2018. The Arizona summit was closed and The University of Valparaiso announced in October that it would withdraw his law school amidst the shortages of enrollments. He did not bring a new class of students this fall when he was aiming to transfer the school to another university. But her efforts to give law school to Middle Tennessee State University have been halted by the tutelary authorities, and she will be stopped by 2020. Meanwhile, the John Marshall Law School in Atlanta pulled the sheet on the Savannah Law School, its satellite campus that has existed for only six years. Will the closures continue in 2019? Thomas Jefferson Law School is fighting for his lifeand many other schools are in trouble.

Law students vs. Big Law This is a story of David and Goliath, in which brave law students play the role of David in the role of Goliath in Big Law. The groups opposed the mandatory arbitration policies for lawyers and non-lawyers in law firms and legal organizations. In the spring, law students from elite schools pushed legal employers to disclose whether or not they require employees to sign such agreements. In the fall, students at Harvard Law School's Pipeline Parity project urged their classmates to boycott companies they knew were using compulsory arbitration, and they achieved fast results. Kirkland & Ellis retreated on compulsory arbitration within two weeks, while Sidley Austin did it without being the subject of a specific boycott. The group is now turning to DLA Piper.

LSAT goes digital The LSAT has existed for 70 years in the form of a paper-and-pencil test. In 2018, the announcement of the update of the examination is now indispensable. From July, the test will be offered digitally on Microsoft Surface Go tablets, with half of the LSAT takers using the tablets. It will be fully digital by September, which will bring it in line with all other standardized graduate admission tests. The admission board of the law school plans to buy about 30,000 tablets to make the transition. Not only that, but the written part of the exam will be separated from the main multi-choice part with the takers completing it at their convenience on their own computer. See you soon, pencils # 2!

The GRE arrives strong L & # 39; ABA flattened in August when the time comes to decide whether it abandons the longstanding requirement that law schools use the LSAT in their admissions. But that did not dampen the tendency of law schools to accept GRE scores alongside LSAT scores. Fewer than 10 law schools accepted GRE in early 2018. Today, 34 schools allow applicants to submit their results for one or the other test. This means that more than one-sixth of the schools participate in the alternative exam. Among the remarkable GRE embracers this year: University of New York Law School; Cornell Law School; and the Faculty of Law, University of Pennsylvania.

Bar Blues All who hoped that 2018 would be the year of passing the exam passed successfully to recover success rates were deeply disappointed, much like the 59% from those who sat on the California bar in July and failed. Ouch. Success rates have also decreased in other major jurisdictions. New York success rate fell five percentage points at 63 percent; Florida rate dropped to 67 percent 71 percent; and the success rate of the first Texas taker fell three points at 78 percent. The national average score in the multi-bar portion of the test has reached a 34 years old.