Because they orbit chaotically, some asteroids would be far more unpredictable than we thought

<p class = "canvas-atom canvas-text Mb (1.0em) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8em) – sm" type = "text" content = "The statistics established today make consensus among astronomers: an asteroid of 20 meters falls on Earth every 60 years, one of more than 140 meters every 10,000 years, one of more than one kilometer every 750,000 years, and & nbsp; every 100 million years, like 66 million years ago. Only considered to be of real concern to humans. Whatever region of the globe they crash into, they will affect populated areas. Rest assured, this risk, as the figures show, is low. This is why we have always considered that the most worrisome asteroids are those we do not know. "data-reactid =" 22 ">The statistics established today make a consensus among astronomers: an asteroid of 20 meters falls on Earth every 60 years, one of more than 140 meters every 10,000 years, one of more than one kilometer every 750,000 years, and every 100 million years, like 66 million years ago. Only considered to be of real concern to humans. Whatever region of the globe they crash into, they will affect populated areas. Rest assured, this risk, as the figures show, is low. This is why we have always considered that the most worrisome asteroids are those we do not know.

<p class = "canvas-atom canvas-text Mb (1.0em) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8em) – sm" type = "text" content = "But the conclusions reached by three astronomers from the University of Leiden in the Netherlands have shaken our certainties – once is not customary in astrophysics. After submitting an astronomical amount of data to an artificial neural network, the researchers were indeed able to determine that certain asteroids hitherto considered harmless could actually one day collide with the Earth. Their observations were published on February 4, 2020 in the journal."data-reactid =" 23 ">But the conclusions reached by three astronomers from the University of Leiden in the Netherlands have shaken our certainties – once is not customary in astrophysics. After submitting an astronomical amount of data to an artificial neural network, the researchers were able to determine that some asteroids previously considered harmless could actually one day collide with the Earth. Their observations were published on February 4, 2020 in the journal.

<h2 class = "canvas-atom canvas-text Mb (1.0em) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8em) – sm" type = "text" content = "HOI, artificial intelligence that learns by going back in time"data-reactid =" 24 ">HOI, artificial intelligence that learns by going back in time

<p class = "canvas-atom canvas-text Mb (1.0em) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8em) – sm" type = "text" content = "Called HOI, for "Hazardous Object Identifier", their detection system relies on artificial intelligence to determine which asteroids circling around the Sun could one morning interrupt their round by crashing on Earth. John D. Hefele, Francesco Bortolussi and Simon Portegies Zwart claim to have been able to identify with their neural network & nbsp;"more than 90% of asteroids (already followed by NASA, editor's note) that could be potentially dangerous. " "We have imagined, built and trained a network & nbsp; of fairly simple structure aiming to identify asteroids likely to impact the Earth in the next 20,000 years", explain the researchers (…)"data-reactid =" 25 ">Called HOI, for "Hazardous Object Identifier", their detection system relies on artificial intelligence to determine which asteroids circling around the Sun could one morning interrupt their round by crashing on Earth. John D. Hefele, Francesco Bortolussi and Simon Portegies Zwart claim to have been able to identify with their neural network "more than 90% of asteroids (already followed by NASA, editor's note) that could be potentially dangerous. " "We have imagined, built and trained a fairly simple structure network to identify asteroids likely to impact the Earth over the next 20,000 years", explain the researchers (…)

<p class = "canvas-atom canvas-text Mb (1.0em) Mb (0) – sm Mt (0.8em) – sm" type = "text" content = "Read more on sciencesetavenir.fr"data-reactid =" 26 "> Read more on sciencesetavenir.fr

Read also